If Only We Knew


[image source]

In today’s WaPo column, Trump’s erratic first week was among the most alarming in history, Ruth Marcus writes,

Week One of the Trump administration was among the most alarming in the history of the American presidency.

There have been scarier weeks for the country, certainly — the Cuban missile crisis and the Sept. 11 attacks. There have been more tragic ones — the Sept. 11 attacks again, the terrible toll of wartime, the horror of four presidential assassinations.

There have been occasions of terrible presidential judgment — Franklin D. Roosevelt’s order to detain U.S. citizens and noncitizens of Japanese descent during World War II. And there have been moments of looming constitutional crisis — during Watergate alone, the Saturday Night Massacre, the showdown with the Supreme Court over the release of the tapes, the impeachment inquiry that resulted in Richard Nixon’s resignation.

Anyone who paid even glancing attention to the 2016 campaign already understood Donald Trump to be undisciplined, easily provoked and self-absorbed to the point of narcissism. But it was one thing to know that in theory; it was much more unsettling to witness President Trump in action. In depressing retrospect, the dark inaugural address, with its invocation of “carnage” and “tombstones,” was the week’s high point.

She goes on to enumerate Trump’s “achievements” so far, and continues:

You will notice that my lament about the week is largely devoid of ideological content. That is not because his policy moves are not appalling — they are. But you don’t have to disagree with Trump’s policies to be rattled to the core by his unhinged behavior. Many congressional Republicans privately express concerns that range from apprehension to outright dread.

There have been reasons to worry about other presidents’ mental health. Lyndon B. Johnson’s senior aides were so concerned about his behavior that they consulted psychiatrists. Nixon in the throes of Watergate was drunk and unstable, so much so that his defense secretary, James Schlesinger, reportedly ordered the military not to respond to White House orders without approval from him or the secretary of state. Still, other presidents’ outbursts occurred behind closed doors, and there was some hope that aides would intervene. Trump’s inner circle seems divided between enablers and inciters.

What is to be done? In a meeting last week with The Post editorial board, Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), chair of the House Oversight Committee, said he was weighing legislation to require presidents to undergo an independent medical examination, including for mental health. Chaffetz cautioned that he wasn’t “talking about some of the rhetoric that’s flying around” about Trump. Still, he said, “If you’re going to have your hands on the nuclear codes, you should probably know what kind of mental state you’re in.”
 

That can’t happen soon enough.

Not soon enough, you say…

I agree.

If only you knew ahead of time what you could expect from a leader with Trump’s character defect. And even if you did not understand it yourself, maybe if there was someone who did and tried to help you with it… It would have been different now, for sure, right?

But, hey, no one could have predicted that the narcissistic psychopath… oops, are we allowed yet to name his pathology or is it still too soon? Anyway, no one knew that he could win. If only there were any precedents for this happening anywhere in the world.

When I was getting tired and discouraged from sending out unacknowledged op-ed letters with explanations and warnings of our future president’s pathology and the destructive, fascistic reign it guaranteed, and complained to my co-conspirator, Dr. Burkle, that I felt like a Cassandra McBonkers screaming on a street corner about the end of the world, he responded by saying (paraphrased), “When Trump becomes president, we just may see the end of the world.”

The WaPo was one of the many papers and other news outlets, along with individual journalists, opinion-makers and politicians from all aisles, which we contacted numerous times throughout 2016. Don’t remember now if Ruth Marcus was one of those contacted individually — maybe, maybe not. But it does not matter as no one wanted to hear what we had to say.

Dr. Burkle sent his last letter of concern and explanation of the character pathology in question to the WaPo and NYT about two weeks before the election. No response (although one of them kindly sent the standard “thanks, but no thanks” e-mail). Those two news outlets, like almost everyone else in the political center, were flying high on the prospect of Hillary’s assured win and writing Trumpism’s obituaries.

We watched in horror.

I know we weren’t the only ones. There were other concerned mental health professionals as well as lay people who raised alarm in public and tried to bring the issue to the attention of the media in other ways, often at a risk, professional and personal, to themselves.

But how do you make someone see what they don’t want to see?

The truth of it is that if we refuse to learn the lessons of history and psychology — and we do, repeatedly — we will be forced to do so. Again and again, it seems, until they take. One of these days.

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P.S. Just got an anniversary note from WordPress congratulating me on blogging for an entire year. I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that this day also marks exactly a year since I made a prediction, right here, of Trump’s rise to power. Good blogging, indeed. Ugh. But this time, unlike a year ago, I think I will keep it up, fates permitting.

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Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging.

And So It Begins

Last night, writing to a friend on the subject of Trump’s most unfortunate first weekend in office, I said the following:

What we know about malignant narcissists is that they psychologically decompensate once they achieve the ultimate position of power. They worsen in every possible way: become more grandiose and paranoid, more aggressive and demanding, and progressively less in touch with reality (and Trump has never been fully in touch with it).

We can expect his narcissistic rage to intensify in proportion to his increasing grandiosity and paranoia. 

His handlers will have to resort to increasingly more “creative” ways to placate and subdue him — and it will work, for a while, until it doesn’t.

There’ll be blood, symbolic, if not literal, as he’ll fire and destroy his previously “trusted” associates, maybe even in rapid succession and without any rhyme or reason. 

His demands for adulation will also become increasingly intense and bizarre, and we’ll be witnessing idiotic and quite possibly dangerous displays of his “superiority” and might, likely military as well. This is where the possibility of him starting a war or two just to satisfy his ego becomes quite real.

It’s not only that he will never get better, but it is certain that he will get worse.

There has never been a case of a malignant narcissist in power whose pathology improved, or even remained stable: they always deteriorate, and often rapidly, as they become drunk on (what they see as) now unlimited power and adulation.

Almost immediately after I sent it, this news item popped up on my computer screen:

Trump declares his Inauguration ‘National Day of Patriotic Devotion’ in proclamation littered with religious buzzwords

The Proclamation 9570, as it is called, is a thing of disordered beauty — and it is highly significant as it marks the official beginning of the kleptofascist regime in the U.S.

This, rather than Trump’s inauguration, which was revealing enough (though it’s too bad he was not allowed to have tanks and missile launchers at his parade, as he desired), is an unmistakable sign — for anyone who still may have harbored some doubts — that we have arrived at our homegrown autocracy of the kind we have not seen, in America, yet.

Whoever wrote that proclamation designed to soothe Agent Orange’s ego gravely injured by the crowds that were too small at his inauguration and too large at his protests — since without a doubt this is its main purpose — must have been as bereft of any sense of irony as the man himself. Or maybe s/he is a stealthily ironic prankster?

That’s because nothing illustrates this famous quote attributed to Sinclair Lewis,

When fascism comes to America, it will come wrapped in the flag and waving a cross.

like that miserable piece of psychopathically narcissistic — but also dangerous –nonsense.

The glaring pathology of it, devoid of higher values but — so completely that it seems cartoonish — co-opting empty and deceitful sloganeering about “Constitution,” of which this man knows nothing and cares even less about, and “patriotism” and “freedom,” just like that of Trump’s “American carnage” inauguration speech, begs for psychoanalysis, but that’s for another time.

I will only briefly remark on one related matter here.

Some observers note the significance of Trump bombastically using “The People” in his inauguration speech as a portent of fascism. They are correct in this observation, but late in making it.

Signs of Trump’s pathological and disingenuous identification with “The People,” an inevitable development in every tyrant’s journey to power, were on full display in the summer, when he also began using the word “movement” to describe the narcissistic collusion between himself and his followers. We can be certain that it was not his idea, but his handlers’; however he glommed onto it, as every tyrant does, to prettify and further justify his push for power and adulation. The signs were already there, early on, it’s just that most did not pay attention.

Back to Proclamation 9570, which, like most of other laws Trump has signed this week (and it’s only Tuesday), is a direct response to the narcissistic injury he suffered over the weekend when he had to endure images of his “comically small” inauguration crowds. In the past, he handled such humiliations through personal responses to specific people. Those included jaw-dropping letters of derision and scorn, or petty and ridiculous, but crippling for the other side, lawsuits; now, however, he can use the office of president to enact his revenge on a large scale and thus make it so much more satisfying — and dangerous to all.

Anyone who knows anything about malignant narcissists in power could easily imagine how enraged Trump must have been over the weekend. Heck, we did not have to strain: his lapdog Spicer’s behavior during his Saturday “press conference” gave us more than a decent clue. But now we have White House reports confirming it.

We know that a humiliated narcissist must release his narcissistic rage somehow, best on those who caused his psychic injury; and if that’s impossible, on the nearest and usually weakest available object (preferably a living one, so he could enjoy watching the suffering).

We don’t know exactly what went on in Trump’s private quarters during that stormy time over the weekend, but we know that, A. he was conspicuously restrained on Twitter (which suggests a strong outside intervention), and, B. he started the week with a slew of executive orders aimed at the issues dear to his protesters.

In addition to the self-serving eruption of “patriotism” in his Proclamation Flag ‘n Cross, he also signed a global gag order, which will have catastrophic consequences for millions of women around the world; ordered construction of the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines; and prohibited scientists, including data collectors who have assembled photos from D.C. during his inauguration, from sharing their work with the public.

How’s that for a payback?

One of my favorite signs during the weekend march was this:

I shudder to think what executive order Trump would come up with in response to it.

We can expect this Trumpian trend — of enshrining his vengeful reactions to the slightest narcissistic injury of shame and humiliation into his presidential decrees — to continue and worsen. This is one hallmark of tyrannical rule by narcissistic psychopaths. There is no bottom to their vengefulness, since, as you may recall, “[n]arcissistic rage is one of the darkest and deadliest forces known to mankind.”

If you have any doubts about it, notice that Trump’s compulsive twitterin’ has subsided — and that’s not because he’s “pivoted” toward reason and self-control, but because now he has replaced it by executive order signing, which, as far as instruments of narcissistic rage go, is much more effective and satisfying. It can punish the offending millions with fewer than 140 strokes of a pen — and you can turn it into a self-aggrandizing photo op at that. It also counts as good ol’ fashioned governing, of the kind that everyone expects of presidents. Win-win.

And these are just his first few days in office.

If tasked with creating an autocratic villain and plausible scenarios of his rise to power, most fiction writers would scoff at Trump and his story, because it would seem such an over-the-top caricature, offensive to their intelligence and artistic sensibilities. Yet once again life proves to be more pedestrian than fiction.

But from the point of view of psychopathology, and especially its intersection with politics, Trump/ism is both predictable and instructive, and also spectacular at the same time, as it provides such a clear confirmation of everything we know to be true about character defective tyrants and the formation of their regimes. From the point of view of human beings who find themselves oppressed by the tyrants and those regimes, however, the spectacularness of it wanes dramatically.

For some (not all) lessons on how to cope what’s in store for us we should look to authoritarian regimes of the past and present: yes, Nazi Germany (sorry all ye Trump’s-not-Hitler! folks out there), the USSR and its Eastern Bloc satellites, North Korea, Cambodia under Pol Pot, Iraq under Saddam, Uganda under Idi Amin, and others like them.

Frederick Burkle’s Antisocial Personality Disorder and Pathological Narcissism in Prolonged Conflicts and Wars of the 21st Century, which talks about these characterologically defective leaders — and which, not at all coincidentally, was the most viewed paper on ResearchGate in 2016 — has a handy list of them if one needs more examples. Now we have our own, here, in America.

The major overarching lessons are (starting with good news) 1. that these leaders and their regimes always fall — always, without exception; but, 2. unfortunately, they cause grave and lasting damage, and traumas that take generations to heal, if they heal at all.

Our yearning for higher values  — truth, freedom, justice, dignity, and love — is irrepressible. When we live in relative peace and comfort, we become complacent and forget that these values are not a given, but must be discovered and created by each of us anew, and often must be fought for.

Karol Wojtyla, later known as John Paul II, wrote in The Place Within that,

Freedom has continually to be won, it cannot merely be possessed. It comes as a gift but it can only be kept with a struggle. Gift and struggle are written into pages, hidden yet open.

People start to remember this truth when their cherished values are threatened. As soon as the tyrant du jour plants his boot on his subjects’ necks, they begin to rebel and eventually rise up against him and his unjust rule. This is a given. It is just a matter of time until the human spirit prevails, even though it may take a very long time indeed.

The Soviet empire lasted  three quarters of the century and almost nobody within or outside of it believed that it could ever fall. But it did, taking its tinpot tyrants with it, as it always happens, in a large measure as a result of the devastation they create: there comes a time where there is nothing else to plunder and no one else to kill to one’s satisfaction, so the tyrants’ avaricious glory has nothing left to feed on. Of course new tyrants, and some say worse than the old ones, often take the reign next. And so the bloody wheel turns, churning out new misery and its victims; but the process, the struggle hidden yet open, in essence always the same, accelerates with every turn, yielding hopeful surprises.

The response to Trump’s enthronement was as swift as it was overwhelming. Close to 3 million women (and men) world-wide marched against him and his pathological rule the day after his inauguration.

No less remarkable — and yet not at all, as an avalanche often begins with one pebble — is the fact that this mass protest started with one woman, Rebecca Shook, a retired lawyer from Hawaii.

This is “unpresidented,” as Twitler himself would sputter, if his handlers allowed him to do so on that fateful day. (He did issue one sarcastic response, and then someone else — my guess is Tom “Soft Sensuality” Barrack — wrote his second, civil tweet for public consumption.) Yes, he has had the last word in that skirmish, as of now — but the battle has just begun.

Eve Ensler in her manifesto reminds us that,

We are marching to turn our fear and sorrow and shame to power and imagination. We are marching for another paradigm where the lack of ethics, morality, and truth that have brought us to this moment are transformed – into principles which will drive a powerful intersectional, spiritual movement of movements.

To be effective, the anti-Trump/ism movement must be widely inclusive and based on solidarity of all people of conscience from all walks of life. It is no accident that “Solidarity,” if you recall, was the name of the first free workers’ union in Poland which toppled communism in Eastern Europe.

What most people in the West do not know, however, is that the real engine — political, moral, and spiritual — of that movement were women. Most people associate “Solidarity” with Nobel-winning Lech Walesa, who was more or less an opportunistic narcissist searching for and stealing spotlight from the people doing the real work behind the scenes. The chief figure among those was Anna Walentynowicz, who became known as the “Mother of Solidarity.”

In the summer of 1980, five months before her retirement from a job as a crane operator in a Gdansk shipyard, Walentynowicz was fired for her participation in an illegal workers’ union. This decision led to a workers’ strike in the shipyard, which then spurred a cascade of developments eventually ending communism in Europe — remember, an unthinkable feat for almost a century.

What’s of special importance is that after the striking workers’ initial demands were met and Walentynowicz was reinstated to her position, Walesa and other men decided that this was enough — there was no more need to protest. But the women of the shipyard, including Walentynowicz, and the male workers’ wives at home, disagreed.

As Wiki says,

Walentynowicz and [another woman worker, Alina] Pienkowska managed to close the gates of the shipyard and keep some workers inside, but many workers went home, only to return by the next day. Wałęsa was stopped near the Gate no° 1 as he was leaving, and was persuaded to change his plans and return to the shipyard.

Walesa was persuaded to return by Pienkowska and Walentynowicz, and the male workers who went home were implored by their wives to go back to the shipyard the next day to continue the strike.

Women, eh?  They do change history.

Late Anna Walentynowicz is one of the people worth knowing. A humble person doing the right thing, she is a moral exemplar, of the kind that we very much need in the world. Not surprisingly, the story of her heroic life was one of nearly constant battles against networks of psychopaths and narcissists in power which included Lech Walesa, under communism as well as — and disappointingly so — after its fall. That story was defined by her tireless struggle for truth and justice, and was marked by several stints in prison as well as attempts at her life, among many other adverse events.

Here is a quote from Walentynowicz, which seems so right for these and any times, and a good end of my post:

Our aim should not be to secure a somewhat thicker slice of bread today, even if this would make us happy; we must not forget what our real aim is. Our main duty is to consider the needs of others. If we become alive to this duty, there will be no unjustly treated people in our midst, and we, in turn, shall not be treated unjustly. Our day-to-day motto should be: “Your problems are also my problems.” We must extend our friendship and strengthen our solidarity.

This American Carnage: Repeal of Obamacare Will Kill Over 43,000 People a Year

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan shares a laugh with Republican members of Congress after signing legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, and to cut off federal funding of Planned Parenthood.
[image source]

This is the estimate of health analysts published in the WaPo today. It is consistent with the numbers of deaths from treatable and preventable health problems prior to Obamacare, which were put at 45,000 a year.

This is how many 43,956, the exact estimate, is (scroll down).

Every “i” below represents a human person, with their unique and unrepeatable life and history, with their pain and suffering completely avoidable if the US had a universal health care, the way other civilized and not nations of the world do.

That suffering spreads, like ripples in a lake, to their orphaned families and communities devastated by their deaths.

Their pain can be measured, if you are an economist, in an amount of money such suffering “wastes” on belated attempts at treatment, diminished productivity, lost wages, and other monetized indices that capitalism uses to translate humanity into a language it understands; but the trauma of it, compounded by the moral injury of knowing that the suffering and deaths are easily preventable, is incalculable.

This is what American (and not only) capitalism does best: it grows trauma upon trauma, until we no longer understand the source of our misery — and we are not supposed to, if the system is to survive.

Repeal of ACA is the opening salvo in this American carnage that Agent Orange promised us in his trademark Freudian slippage way.

This is how many 43,956 is:

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Continue reading

To Chuck Todd about Something Trump Did


[image source]

This is the second installment of what likely will become a regular feature of this blog: translating Trump for the glorious make-benefit of Chuck Todd, an overexcitable host of Meet the Press, whose heart, I believe, is in the right place, even though his mind cannot always keep up. Snarky as that sounds, I have great — well, ok, moderate– hopes for the man, as I watch his growing spine, strengthened after every encounter with Kellyanne Goebbels Conway and other representatives of Agent Orange.

Chuck is quickly discovering the WTF Zone, in which most Americans have lived their lives, watching in mute horror the disaster developing in and around them thanks to the political grandmasters who use them as fodder for their profiteering schemes.

WTF Zone is like The Twilight Zone, minus its whimsy and uplifting message. There is no way out of it, other than (falsely) through numbing the pain it creates with mind-altering substances (and/or virtual reality), which for most Americans lead to more alienation, suffering and, increasingly, death; or (authentically) through a radical self-transformation, which is rare and seemingly — so far at least, though this may change — beyond the reach for most.

On today’s MTP, Chuck tried to get an answer from Mrs. Goebbels to a simple but loaded question: why Trump sent his  press secretary Sean Spicer — a small man in every sense of the term, who always looks as though he’s seconds away from blowing his gasket along with the collar of his tight-fitting shirt — to lie, shamelessly and angrily, about something as silly as the size of his inauguration crowd.

Of course Chuck got no answer, but instead a stream of obfuscations and deflections which are the specialty of the Agent Orange Propaganda Corp, and in which Kellyanne excels like no others. That’s Psychopathic Lying 101: no sweat, no conflictual emotion, no whiff of discomfort or scruple over one’s smoothly delivered “alternative facts” (she actually used that very term).

Chuck later tried to extract the answer from another of Trump’s snake-like surrogates, Tom “Soft Sensuality” Barrack.

The SS moniker comes from Barrack’s creative and jaw-dropping spin of the impossibility to secure A-list celebrities for Trump’s inauguration. Instead of confirming what’s obvious to everyone — that no person with a conscience and a right mind would want to associate with Trumputin — Barrack ventured that Donald prefers the soft sensuality of the surroundings free of A-listers and other such nuisances. What a great example of the forked golden tongue at work.

If we are to associate Trump — or Barrack himself, for that matter — with soft sensuality, then we may as well grandfather Marquise de Sade into that exclusive club, and seriously consider Jack the Ripper’s application too.

Anyway, back to the purpose of this post, which is helping Chuck Todd understand Trump.

The reason why Trump sent Spicer to bark lies at the press about the size of his inauguration package is the same reason why he, Trump, always brags about the size of his anything. His malignant narcissism demands to assert at every opportunity that he is the bestest, most tremendousest, huugest, and amazingest, bar none, and crush anyone who may disagree. (And I suspect you know it already, but bless you for asking anyway.)

Having had pictures of his meager inauguration crowds, much smaller than those of Obama (an unforgivable slight), circulated by the media, and then being upstaged by the world-wide women’s march must have been an intolerable injury to his ego.

And we know what happens when a narcissist’s ego is injured: hell hath no fury.

You could see that fury, by proxy, twisting Spicer’s tongue, making him avoid eye contact with the audience, trip over his words, and bring him close to apoplexy, averted only by his scurrying, cowardly exit that prevented taking and answering any questions from the journalists. (That’s what “press conferences” under Trump will look like. Get used to it –or, better yet, not.)

Some folks on twitter used the term Pravda-esque to describe this “press conference,” but I don’t remember such levels of aggression and contempt during communist pressers way back when. This is really more Hitler, from what I saw, than placid Kosygin or clueless Brezhnev, although Stalin may have qualified — but that was before my time.

The Orange One, meanwhile, had a disgraceful in person “meeting” with the intelligence community, which he used to (yes, you guessed it) brag about the size of his inauguration crowds and peddle other lies to a seemingly shocking — until we remember that Trumpists hire cheerleaders for his public performances — applause from the audience. He also told the intel people “I’m so behind you,” which sounded more like a threat than support (and you can bet that this is what it really was), reminiscent of his stalking behavior during the second debate with Hillary.

This is what Trump’s increasingly staged and choreographed contacts with the public will look like from now on, as the man continues to become more withdrawn from reality and consumed by his dreams of glory, supported in this dangerous but inevitable development by his sycophants, but also by his opportunistic enemies who are already plotting his demise.

It will be important for his loyalists to keep him isolated and protected from facts, because as his grandiosity, now fully validated, intensifies, so will his rage whenever the unpleasant truth breaks through the veil of his narcissistic delusions.

When that happens, anyone in his vicinity is vulnerable.

This aspect of his decompensating psyche will be carefully — well, as carefully as it is possible — hidden from the public; but we will see reflections of it in the behavior of his proxies — not the smooth snaky, softly sensual (gaah) Barracks, but the bull-terrier Spicers and Piersons (yes, she’s still around). As they deliver his messages of calibrated rage, Trumputin will be watching and deciding whether their ire meets his expectations and if the lies sound convincing to him — because that’s what really matters from now on; while the brazen destruction of what remains of our democracy will proceed right on the GOPers’ schedule — unless we, the people, intervene, of course.

So, Chuck, welcome to kleptofascist pathocracy. We’ve been in it for a while, so we are a tad more experienced in deciphering its ways. You are just opening your eyes, but that’s a good start. Keep at it. I have faith in ya.

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Bonus feature:

Kellyanne’s opinion on the women’s marches:

“We certainly respect people’s First Amendment rights. But I frankly didn’t see the point. I mean, you have a day after he’s uplifting and unifying and you have folks here being on a diatribe where I think they could have requested a dialogue. Nobody called me and said, ‘Hey, could we have a dialogue?’”

Yes, because if there is one thing that Mrs. Goebbels excels in, it is the art of, um, dialogue. She is as good at that as she is at redefining words — uplifting and unifying prime examples.

 

Donny vs. Nasty Women of the World

This is going on as we speak (or type, rather): women (and men who love and respect them) world over have risen and protested against Trump and his misogynist, racist, kleptofascist, psychopathic (excuse the redundancy) ilk.

World over.

Even in Antarctica:

Be still, my heart.

In Leonard Cohen’s poignant Anthem, which I posted yesterday, there is this part, one that he sings with barely contained anger in his 2008 London performance:

I can’t run no more
With that lawless crowd
While the killers in high places
Say their prayers out loud
But they’ve summoned, they’ve summoned up
A thundercloud
And they’re going to hear from me

Yes, Donny has summoned up a thundercloud of revolt, from people of conscience world over. The world wide pussy riot is just one, spectacular, part of it.

Richard said, “My growing view is that [psychopaths] are catalysts for spiritual change.” That is indeed what we are experiencing and witnessing now.

Watch this:

Ring the bell that still can ring

Below, I’m reposting my first “real” post on this blog, published almost exactly a year ago.

The post was tagged a “fairy tale,” even though it tells, briefly, a true and universal story as old as the world. The story will keep repeating itself until we change ourselves, and the world.

Underneath it, Leonard Cohen‘s Anthem, which seems just right.

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The Wages of Discontent

Image result for those who don t study history are doomed to repeat it

Those were difficult times.

The People’s unhappiness and fear intensified as their economic situation stagnated and worsened, and they saw their hopes for the future shattered not only by their dwindling life opportunities, but also by the influx and sometimes prosperity of The Others, the foreigners. There was a growing sense that their country, burdened by excessive international obligations and recent war fiascos, was on the wrong track. It also faced external threats from The Enemy, whose menacing power was a nearly constant drum in daily news and political discussions and speeches.

As it is always the case in such trying times, The People yearned for a savior who materialized, not so much out of thin air, but from the always present class of such leaders ready for their chance: men (almost invariably) who promise to rescue The People and make their country and/or the world great again. The dying dreams of glory could be resurrected, fueled by righteous anger and a desire for renewal and purity in public and private lives.

The Leader ran on the platform of good old-fashioned values — faith, family, prosperity, freedom, and national pride — which resonated strongly with The People who saw themselves as increasingly dispossessed and disenfranchised, with their ways and traditions threatened in those uncertain times. Bold and charismatic, he spoke their language, not afraid to name The Others as the reason for The People’s misery and discontent. The People loved him. His words were simple and free of the complicated jargon of bureaucrats, which endeared his followers ever more to him. He told it like it was. There was no doubt in the minds of The People that this strong, decisive man was exactly what their country and the world needed.

Those who looked upon his rise to power with skepticism and fear, knowing that it spelled disaster, were ridiculed by the masses invigorated by The Leader’s message of revival and his promises of a great future for all. They were called wusses, cowards, or worse, traitors. Needless to say, they were unable to stop it.

The Leader, elected by his faithful majority, took the reins of power to great fanfare, followed by grand spectacles of national unity and strength, which continued for a long time, and as loudly as his revolutionary reforms were implemented in relative silence. His supporters felt prouder than ever. It made sense to them that certain sacrifices should be made to reclaim the country’s strength. (Although one was hard pressed to see those developments as sacrifices, given that they involved those others, the foreigners, and were designed to make their own nation great again.) That was the way to do it. That’s why they elected The Leader.

The rest was history.

Cartoon by Tom Toro from The New Yorker

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See No Evil


[image source]

“History lays down events over the struggles of conscience.”

Karol Wojtyla

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Following news these days is educational despite this being labeled, inaccurately, a post-fact or post-truth era.

Only those who forgot that WWII started on the basis of fake news, or already repressed WMD, Judith Miller, and the rest of journalistic sycophants of the Bush cabal, can call our current moment in time post-factual while in fact it is as it ever was.

Public discourse, especially for political purposes but not only, is always largely post-factual. As rationalizing rather than rational beings we don’t do so well with facts. Dealing with truth is uncomfortable, so we prefer to muddy it and create our own facts to suit our psychological needs — make ourselves feel better — reality be damned.

The two things that make the process different in America today are the faster spread of fake news from a greater number of sources; and the malignant presence of a profoundly characterologically defective leader who, surrounded by an ever-expanding network of similarly disordered characters, infects society with his personal pathology through normalization of blatant lies and other openly unethical behavior.

One of the chief characteristics of a narcissistic psychopath is his flexible approach to reality, which is always distorted to suit his pathological needs; and, inextricably related, a lack of conscience with its recognition and respect for values like truth, justice and honor. A natural penchant for sowing discord and destruction is another of a narcissistic psychopath’s instantly recognizable traits.

We should know this already if we cared about truth, but, generally speaking, we don’t. So what’s being dubbed, not quite correctly, as the post-fact reality now is an enhanced manifestation of this specific pathology spreading rapidly on a mass scale and affecting all elements of our society.

With these developments,  we have entered a post-irony era, where the tragically absurd now rules with supreme confidence befitting the triumph of the narcissistic blindness that has paved its way. And thanks mostly, but by no means exclusively, to our soulless soon-to-be Destroyer in Chief — a man with small hands, an even smaller mind, and a big dictators’ envy — we can also call it a post-ethics era, in every possible, imaginable and not, way.

Just this week, we had our healthcare gutted in the middle of the night, and saw Walter Shaub Jr., director of the Office of Government Ethics, who dared to criticize the pathetic charade of Trump’s “solving” his conflicts of interest, being called to “testify” in front of the morally compromised House Republicans, a.k.a Trump’s firing squad (not literal so far, but the dictatorship is still young). Earlier this month, the GOPers wanted to get rid of their own ethics watchdog altogether, but their strategery, to use a Dubyanismwas not quite right: they were too early and too open about it, a mistake they won’t make the second time, to be sure. Those are the kinds of laws still best passed under the cover of darkness and misinformation.

This, and worse, is to be expected in a pathocracy, but one is still somewhat surprised to see how quickly its Trumpian, kleptofascist version is taking hold in America. The man is not even President yet, but his psychopathic network is already fully operational and exerting its sick influence as though this is entirely normal.

The speed of this process just confirms that the pathological network has already been in place and ready for a leader like Trump who would give it permission to come out into the open without any reservations, like some residual inhibitions acquired perhaps, if only by a necessity of decorum, during Obama years — you know, an appearance of scruples and some other manifestations of conscience.

And it is a further proof of how seriously disordered we are as a society.

We can tell how deep we are in the post-irony/post-ethics of the Trumpian swamp by watching the perfectly coiffed and made up talking heads continue calling Trump “unconventional” and “unpredictable” (Vlad must laugh at this one), a man with “unique communication” skills and an “unorthodox style” in his cabinet picks.

It is still somehow unclear to them how he will govern, despite being clobbered with evidence of his defective character for some 30 years or so — evidence which they themselves helpfully and entirely uncritically disseminated all these years, giggling under their breaths.

Now they just tell us to expect more of the “unconventional” from him, in the same bemusedly exasperated tones that wives use to talk about their husbands’ habit of putting butter in their coffee or wearing socks with sandals. “Oh, you know how Gerald is. What can you do?”

The reality of it does not seem to sink in.

Article after article has been written comparing and mostly contrasting Trump with Hitler, in the “yes, maybe he is kinda like Hitler, but here is how he really isn’t” manner, because the truth is either so obscured or unbearable that, unable to acknowledge it, we dilute it with undue focus on inconsequential details which make it easier for us to ignore the dark heart of the matter. Why, if a tyrant must have a mustache and screech in German, in 1930s, about inferior non-Aryans, then by definition Trump is not a tyrant. See? No evil.

Even more disturbingly, his character defect continues to be glamorized by people who should know better. He is still being characterized as a “genius” at media use and repeatedly ascribed special skills, showing how easy we are to mesmerize by the open mendacity of rich and famous narcissistic psychopaths.

People who presumably should know better call him “practical,” which is as far from the truth as almost anything that has come out of his own mouth; and “cathartic,” which, granted, may have some merit, in the same way violent vomiting and diarrhea are cathartic during a norovirus infection. To think of it, that may count as practical, too, in a noroviral cinch.

There are also those among his opponents who erroneously compare him to Chauncey Gardiner, a fictional character without qualities whose improbable rise to power was a function of luck and the ignorance of his supporters, not noticing the glaring differences between the two characters. Chauncey was a man without convictions; Trump, in contrast, has a few and strong ones, the chief among them that of his greatness and entitlement to power and adulation. Chauncey was empty, Trump is full — of his bloated self.

Even someone as astute as Noam Chomsky who understands the dangers posed by Trump’s presidency, does not fully grasp the extent of his character defect when he says that the man evidences “some loose similarities to other demagogic figures”  — an understatement of the year.

Among those Trump’s critics who misunderestimate (oh, Dubya) the grave importance of his individual pathology is The New Yorker‘s Jeffrey Frank.

In his piece, What if a President Loses Control?, he writes,

There’s no need to dwell on the particular character of Trump, who will be sworn in on January 20th. But it is worth examining what remedies exist if any President is too careless, inattentive, or impulsive to deal sensibly with questions affecting the nation’s survival.

That one phrase, “no need to dwell,” is a perfect dismissal of evil, which is the inherently destructive and sadistic nature of a narcissistic psychopath, especially dangerous in one in power but not only.

This dismissal is solidified by the author’s focus on the carelessness, inattentiveness, and impulsivity of Trump (or any other “hypothetical” President — as if we ever had, or could have, anyone remotely so pathological in this position).

What he and most others don’t seem to realize is that one can possess all three of those characteristics, and still be a benevolent person. The greatest danger of Trump’s character defect lies not in his poor attention, impulsivity and carelessness, problematic as they are, but in his lack of conscience and co-existent grandiosity and unbridled drive for power and adulation.

Further down in the article, Frank equates the not-so-hypothetical presidential “incapacity” that may require external intervention with “insanity” and even a physical illness. This is not just factually slippery (character disorders are not mental illness), but again the denial of evil we are faced with in Trump and other defective characters like him.

Of course the “no need to dwell” may just be the author’s way to avoid shipment, in the near future, to a concentration camp. But purposeful abstaining from identifying evil when faced with it still amounts to its denial, if not endorsement.

Another good example of the well-meaning but misguided attempt of assessing Trump and his political (and not only) influences is David Bell’s article Donald Trump Is Making the Great Man Theory of History Great Again, published in a recent edition of Foreign Policy.

Bell is a historian, so his mild-mannered confusion, unlike that of some experts on psychopathology, may perhaps be excused. But that confusion is instructive all the same.

The problem is already evident in the title which, with the kind of irony that jars in our post-ironic age, still ascribes greatness to Trump as if it were 2016 (it’s a safe bet, though, that Donny himself would love it).

The title refers to a specific strand of academic (and not just) thought, which Bell examines as he tries to take a critical look at the ways that historians and sociologists use to assess socio-political trends in the  world. He grapples with the importance assigned to historical “great men” — his examples include both “heroes and villains:” Lincoln, Bonaparte, Stalin, Hitler, and Churchill, among others — in shaping world’s events; and, after protracted explanations of his internal deliberation process, he concludes that “it is hard not to agree with my academic colleagues who have put populism, more than personality, at the center of their analyses of the election.” See, no evil.

Populism has become a catchphrase this season for the pearl-clutchy astonishment of our elites shocked, shocked, by the vulgarians at their designer gates. And like working class in America, it is a term that’s loosely defined but emotionally pungent since it serves as a repository for the elites’ contempt, horror, and pity, as well as  — and most importantly — the comfortable dullness of their consciences.

It is true that without the support of the working stiffs, Trump, like Hitler et al., would not attain the highest position of power; but discounting or minimizing his character defect and its predictable destructive influences is puzzling, at the least, especially after one already used other similar characters (Hitler and Stalin) for comparison.

And blaming, directly or not, the nebulous working class for his win is just another way that the privileged, in their time-honored tradition, scapegoat the unwashed for the social ills that their own greed, arrogance and indifference inflicted on the world.

Let’s not forget that the Trumpists on and off TV and other media, his most vocal supporters and sycophants,  are wealthy and educated, with only a passing, if that, acquaintance with the working class.

His well-heeled critics are not much better.

After the tragic farce of Trump’s “press conference” this week, the WaPo editorial board issued a statement faintly praising his purported step in the right ethical direction. One is forced to ask if they watched the same sordid spectacle, complete with hired cheerleaders, as the rest of us did; and if so, whether they understood what happened there. Judging by that editorial, the answer would be a qualified no.

That’s how quickly, under toxic leadership, the profoundly pathological becomes normal, something that surprised even Chuck Todd. (Now that’s progress. Of sorts.)

Even such cogent critics of Trump like Jennifer Rubin and Kurt Eichenwald succumb to peculiar ambivalence allowing them to cultivate delusions of the man’s harmlessness, and they do that as they describe his pathology within the same sentence or paragraph.

Rubin writes,

A week from today, President-elect Donald Trump will be sworn in. More than most presidencies, uncertainty (for some, panic) may be the defining sentiment as the country embarks on a journey that may test America’s democratic principles, decency and common sense. We have elected someone who has very little of any of those three precious commodities. Honesty demands that we all concede we have no idea whether he’ll be among the worst presidents (perhaps not even finishing his term), remarkably mediocre or a surprising success.

We have no idea? Rubin must be speaking for the pundits. That’s because we non-pundits know what the future brings for leaders with Trump’s character defect — we have seen it too many times before. She then proceeds to ask 10 questions showing that indeed she has no idea. At this point that’s not honesty we are talking about — especially given the breathtaking denial of the indisputable fact which she herself brought up (“we have elected someone who has very little of any of those three precious commodities”) — but some form of psychological dimness, willful ignorance, or worse. That’s how post-factualness happens.

Eichenwald, detailing his romp through Trump’s twitterverse, observes that,

it is impossible to know if Trump is giving a considered argument reflecting the direction of his administration based on input from experts, or is just reacting to something he read on a cereal box.

This, after he presents a damning record, stretching back years in time, of Trump’s impulsively vindictive, bombastic, and inane tweeting life. (Psst, Kurt! The answer is B, a cereal box — but don’t tell anyone, lest they lose their last illusions.) Later, he offers Trump all kinds of “helpful” advice, somehow believing that the man understands it or cares to hear it.

One marvels.

On the same broadcast of PBS Newshour, where the well-mannered hosts were (and continue to be) mildly-to-moderately baffled by the president-elect, there was a segment featuring young winners of a prestigious science competition.

What with news being educational in unexpected ways, we learned from it that we are capable of inventing a device that “can detect a disturbance of (…) one part in 1,000 billion billion, or something like 1/1,000 of the diameter of a proton,” but we cannot see a malignant, inherently destructive narcissist prominently ensconced in our midst, one whose character defect, which he does not even bother to mask, is — or should be — starkly obvious to people with a conscience. This is a disconcerting fact, one of the few that remain unchanging in this supposedly post-factual world.

To America’s credit, people with a functioning conscience appear to outnumber those without it. But, as this election and its aftermath show as well, the number of those with an impaired conscience is also greater than we always hope.

The problem, as always, is that those without a conscience find it too easy to seize power and impose their pathological ways on the conscience-full majority. Sick, disordered, and decaying societies, whose members are emotionally lost and morally confused, are especially vulnerable to influences of character defective leaders, those human weeds that proliferate with such an ease and suffocate everything that’s tender, noble, and most worthy in the world.

We don’t like talking about it, however. We don’t even want to see it.

The powers-that-be understand and always exploit this reluctance, creating their versions of facts and ethics for mass consumption. This is nowhere as apparent as in totalitarian systems, where truth is always the first casualty of the tyrant du jour and his ruling cabal. The pathological characters in power thrive on our confusion and do what they can to plant it firmly in our minds and souls. They do it through all the means available to them and in every sphere of our activity.

Andrzej Lobaczewski, creator of ponerology, distinguishes two major reality-bending maneuvers instituted by pathological (mostly psychopathic and narcissistic) leaders and their propagandists:

Paralogisms – Particular manners of twisting logic to falsely make the illogical appear logical and vice-versa.

and

Paramoralisms – Specific methods of twisting morality to falsely portray the unethical as ethical and vice-versa.

These two go hand in hand, since you can only twist the truth through paralogisms if you make people morally weak and confused via paramoralisms, and thus render them susceptible to such manipulations.

And it is a vicious cycle, because when you consistently distort the truth, you also confuse people’s sense of right and wrong, turning them into complacent instruments of evil, something that, with time, becomes normal or necessary in their minds.

One consequence of this confusion is our lack of awareness of how dangerous Trump’s character defect really is, in itself and in its influences on the rest of us. This lack is rooted in our ignorance of psychological problems, but also, and more importantly, in our lack of understanding and a denial of evil.

Howard Ditkoff, whose blog gives a comprehensive presentation of Lobaczewski’s work (and goes far beyond it), looks at our most common reactions to evil, and reasons behind our denial of and/or non- or anti-scientific approach to it:

  • Some simply philosophize about evil, treating it as an abstract, rather than practical, matter.
  • Some principally focus on evil through literature or art in which it is portrayed as a shadowy mystical or, at times, even romantic force.
  • Some are drawn to and stubbornly cling to unsupported, oversimplified explanations or wild conspiracy theories.
  • Some take a theological approach, framing evil as the product of vague supernatural agents such as spirits or demons.
  • Some relate to evil primarily emotionally, experiencing or expressing sentiments, in regard to it or its manifestations, ranging from deep sadness to furious rage.
  • Some mainly relate to evil moralistically, experiencing themselves as proudly superior to “wrong-doers,” stridently demanding righteous behavior from others and even impulsively advocating for aggressive or violent revenge against those who do not comply.
  • Some say that we can simply never truly understand the origins and nature of evil.
  • Some, for a variety of reasons, refuse to even discuss the topic.

Even many professionals, when forced to confront and speak about questions of evil raised in the course of their work, limit their role to a descriptive one, while evading any responsibility to more deeply explore its core nature or origins.

And all of these cases can involve a sometimes egotistical refusal to risk the shattering experience that can result from thoroughly considering whether one’s impression of evil may be incorrect or incomplete.

All those reactions, and the reasons behind them, serve to normalize evil. If we cannot admit evil’s existence, or minimize it through various self-serving rationalizations that we confuse with intellectual and/or moral sophistication, we either won’t notice it or will explain it away, to ourselves and others, in ways that dilute it and its pernicious influence on our lives.

Granted, character defective individuals like narcissists and psychopaths, who are the embodiment of evil, are good at deception, aided in it by what some call “charm,” which is nothing other than manipulative glibness exploiting our own vanity and ignorance.

Last July, This American Life featured a story about Doug Deason, a wealthy Republican donor unwilling to support Trump “on principle” — until he briefly met with the man and had a doubt-dissolving epiphany of the kind that Bush experienced when he saw “soul” in Putin’s eyes. When asked what specifically about Trump changed his opinion about him during their 30-minute meeting, the awe-stricken Deason gave a list of embarrassing platitudes and empty compliments, which lead him and his even wealthier father to a conclusion that Trump is “a really nice guy.” See, no: Evil.

That story is much worth listening to, or reading about, for many reasons; one of them is an illustration of how money warps not just the perceptions of those awash in it, but also reality for the rest of us through its purposefully controlled influence on everything from politics to education. We know it, of course, but hearing it from the horse’s mouth, so to speak, delivered with a matter of fact (here’s that word again) calm cynicism gives it an extra dark, yet familiar, tinge. All it takes for evil to prevail is its narcissistic nod of approval. And money.

At best, the opinionators vaguely aware of the looming disaster pat themselves on their own backs for issuing clever pronouncements on how history rhymes without repeating itself. It somehow makes sense to them, and that’s because it makes them feel better about themselves.

Only people who do not understand history and the human suffering that suffuses it all around us, every step of its bloody way, can be so blithe about it. And that’s always a lot of people, always too many of them, as ivory towers are not just for pundits; but this may possibly change now, since Trump/ism is here to help with that by shattering these comfortable illusions, along with the world as we know it.

We are facing large scale problems of unprecedented severity and scope, growing disasters in every sphere of our functioning that compound and reinforce each other, leading, quicker than we are willing to realize, to undoing of what we know as a civilized world. Yet instead of acknowledging and addressing these problems head on, in a concerted and cooperative manner, we, allergic to truth as we have always been, continue to pursue primitive goals that speed up our destruction and get bogged in petty squabbles, often leading to wars and mayhem and accelerating our self-annihilation. We do this by, among other things, electing characterologically defective leaders and then normalizing their toxic reign.

We don’t lack intelligence, and our technological powers grow exponentially in ways that should enable us to successfully tackle most of our problems, or at least slow down their progression. But we severely lack one most significant ingredient: an active conscience. Our conscience appears to be the most scarce and vulnerable of our resources, and one most desperately needed.

Conscience, with its empathy, guilt, shame, and a lived understanding and respect for higher values confers immunity, individual and collective, against the virus of psychopathization. We can tell how weakened our consciences, and moral immunity, are by our inability to recognize and name evil in our midst.

It’s no accident that fate, such as it is, sent us the conscienceless embodiment of the seven deadly sins to choose as this nation’s leader. And choose we did, for good reasons.

He is a mirror of all our vices, including our moral confusion; and if we are still healthy enough, then, horrified by this dark reflection, we’d take its lesson seriously and learn from it, changing our complacent ways, and fast, by activating our conscience and putting it to work. We still have it, even though it’s laid dormant in many. This is a perfect time to awaken it, once and for all.

Updated on 1/19/17.